A Culture of Discipline

Why You Should Create A Strong Culture Of Discipline

Have you ever worked for an organisation and wondered if it’s the lack of leader and worker discipline that has prevented it from rising to the next level? I have – and I’m not alone in my thoughts. Business expert and author of Good to Great, Jim Collins has stated: “a culture of discipline is not a principle of business; it is a principle of greatness.” After all, great retail companies that grow and continue to succeed are led by self-disciplined leaders who encourage a deeper culture of discipline.

businessman thinking and looking in night city

 

I’m not talking about dictatorship or forcing behaviours and rules. No one likes a tyrant. It’s about creating processes and systems within your company that keep your workers motivated and focussed on ensuring you build a strong foundation of discipline as a team.

However, the breakthrough point can only be reached when you achieve a seamless culture of disciplined people, disciplined thought, and disciplined action.

Disciplined people

Regardless of how small or large your organisation and your management structure, discipline must start at the top of your retail chain. If there’s a lack of discipline at the head of your team, problems among staff can easily escalate. It’s always up to leaders and CEOs to set the right tone and culture of a business – which is why it’s crucial for you to adopt Level 5 leadership qualities.

Level 5 leaders are humble with huge ambition for their organisation rather than themselves. Not only are great leaders proven to be better at creating a culture of discipline, but they also praise their workers and take personal responsibility when the shit hits the fan.

As a leader, it’s up to you to build discipline in both thought and action by setting clear expectations, reviewing performance, and rewarding disciplined behaviour. You also need to provide those who are unwilling or even unable to help you sustain such a culture of discipline with a one-way ticket off your bus.

Disciplined thought

In my last article, I talked about the Hedgehog Concept – and how retail businesses who are like hedgehogs are able to transform the complexities of a business into simple and profound solutions. The Hedgehog Concept also involves setting a simple business strategy to ensure accelerated growth through three key questions including:

  • What can you be the best at?
  • What drives your economic engine?
  • What are you deeply passionate about?

You need to be honest and disciplined in answering all three questions without being distracted by outside opportunities to find your Hedgehog Concept and stay within the three circles. It takes disciplined thought to understand the three circles and say no to anything that doesn’t fit within them. Without disciplined thought, you won’t create anything great at all.

Disciplined action

To ensure you successfully execute your main business focus and strategy, it’s essential that you take disciplined action. Be sure not to confuse reactive action for proactive action, though, or you’ll end up like many good and average companies that struggle to see long-term growth plans succeed. Start with a ‘to do’ list and a ‘stop doing’ list.

Ask yourself – which actions best support the Hedgehog Concept and which ones don’t? It’s up to you to figure out and strengthen the discipline to do the right things and eliminate anything that falls outside of the Hedgehog Concept’s three intersecting circles.

Essentially, you need to stop:

  • Making rash decisions
  • Trying to expand your business without the right strategy
  • Trying to rival your competitors for the sake of it
  • Hiring people that don’t fit with your disciplined culture
  • Undertaking anything that doesn’t meet your long-term growth plan

You’ll initially need to do some experimenting to build a culture of discipline and responsibility, as well as define specific goals. On-going analysis of your strategy is also key to ensuring your retail business stays on track and you can establish any minor problems before they become too big to rectify.

Ultimately, in order for your business to work, all three concepts must pull in the same direction. But remember – a culture of discipline is not just about action. It’s about building a culture and team of self-disciplined and passionate individuals who engage in disciplined thought and ignore opportunities that fall outside the three circles. Only then can you take disciplined action to ensure the flywheel (your retail business) can really take off.